JESPY welcomes thespian and business consultant to board – Essex News Daily

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SOUTH ORANGE, NJ – JESPY House has announced the addition of business consultant Samantha Jones and Broadway actress Diane Davis to its board of directors. A non-profit organization based in South Orange, JESPY House offers a wide range of support services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities; visit jespy.org to learn more.

Jones, a resident of Princeton, has been a public servant since 2000 and brings extensive experience in executive coaching, digital transformation, leadership and change management. A published author, she received her BA in Communications from the University of Stockton. She went on to earn an MBA with a concentration in management from Centenary University and a doctorate in business administration from Liberty University with a concentration in leadership, cum laude. Jones said once she became familiar with JESPY, she was impressed with the support it provided for adults with IDD.

“With a close family member with IDD, I often think about what life will be like for them as they get older, so I knew I had to join this council to contribute to this great cause,” Jones said.

Davis, a Maplewood resident who has a background with JESPY, is a longtime comedian. Best known for performing on stage as Ginny Potter in ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ on Broadway, she also appeared in ‘Golden Boy’, ‘Old Acquaintance’ and ‘Festen’. His performance credits also include a host of off-Broadway, regional theater and television productions such as “FBI: Most Wanted”, “Person of Interest” and “Blue Bloods”. She holds an MFA from New York University’s Theater Graduate Program.

In 2018, Davis worked with JESPY clients on a campaign to help retain and continue funding for the Division of Developmental Disabilities in New Jersey, teaching clients to tell stories about what JESPY has meant to their life.

“I then helped edit and roll out a series of videos for state senators,” Davis said. “I fell in love with the clients, the mission and all that JESPY brings to our SOMA community.”

The two new members of JESPY’s board of directors look forward to participating in the future of the agency. “Growing JESPY House means helping more clients navigate the community,” said Jones, who has also taught and taught at Princeton Review. “I hope to contribute to the growth and development of JESPY in any way I can.”

One of Davis’ goals as a board member is to use his love and connection to the arts.

“I believe I can offer my artistic skills to further integrate JESPY and its clients into the local community through outreach programs,” she said, adding that these client projects would include working with clients to create and write their own plays to perform locally.

Mary H. Martino